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Allen Jenkins

Allen Jenkins

Known For: Acting · Birthday: 1900-04-09 · Deathday: 1974-07-20 (74 years old) · Gender: Male · Place of Birth: Staten Island, New York City, New York, USA

123 Movies · 11 TV shows

Also Known As: Alfred McGonegal

Biography

Allen Curtis Jenkins (born Alfred McGonegal; April 9, 1900 – July 20, 1974) was an American character actor and singer who worked on stage, film, and television.

Career

Jenkins was born on Staten Island, New York, on April 9, 1900. He studied at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. In his first stage appearance, he danced next to James Cagney in a chorus line for an off-Broadway musical called Pitter-Patter, earning five dollars a week. He also appeared in Broadway plays between 1923 and 1962, including The Front Page (1928). His big break came when he replaced Spencer Tracy for three weeks in the Broadway play The Last Mile.Jenkins was called to Hollywood by Darryl F. Zanuck and signed first to Paramount Pictures and shortly afterward to Warner Bros. His first role in films came in 1931, when he appeared as an ex-convict in the short Straight and Narrow. He had originated the character of Frankie Wells in the Broadway production of Blessed Event and reprised the role in its film adaptation, both in 1932. With the advent of talking pictures, he made a career out of playing comic henchmen, stooges, policemen, taxi drivers, and other 'tough guys' in numerous films of the 1930s and 1940s, especially for Warner Bros. Allen Jenkins was labeled the "greatest scene-stealer of the 1930s" by The New York Times. In 1959, Jenkins played the role of elevator operator Harry in the comedy Pillow Talk. He was a member of Hollywood's so-called "Irish Mafia", a group of Irish-American actors and friends which included Spencer Tracy, James Cagney, Pat O'Brien and Frank McHugh.Jenkins later voiced the character of Officer Charlie Dibble on the Hanna-Barbera TV cartoon, Top Cat (1961–62). He was a regular on the television sitcom Hey, Jeannie! (1956–57), starring Jeannie Carson and often portrayed Muggsy on the 1950s-1970s CBS series The Red Skelton Show. He was also a guest star on many other television programs, such as The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Mr. & Mrs. North, I Love Lucy, Playhouse 90, The Tab Hunter Show, The Ernie Kovacs Show, Zane Grey Theater, and Your Show of Shows. He had a cameo appearance in It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963). Eleven days before his death, he made his final appearance, at the end of Billy Wilder's remake of The Front Page (1974); it was released posthumously. Jenkins publicized his own alcoholism and was the first actor to speak in the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate about it. He was involved in beginning the first Alcoholics Anonymous programs in California prisons for women.Jenkins is interred at Rock Creek Cemetery in Washington, D.C., Section 10, Lot 31.

Movies & TV shows

2003.

1 Movie

1988.

1 Movie

1983.

1 Movie

1974.

1 Movie

1967.

2 Movies

1966.

1 TV show

1965.

1 TV show

1964.

3 Movies · 1 TV show

1961.

2 TV shows

1960.

1 Movie

1959.

1 Movie

1954.

1 TV show

1953.

1 TV show

1952.

2 Movies · 1 TV show

1951.

3 Movies · 3 TV shows

1949.

2 Movies

1948.

1 Movie

1947.

7 Movies

1946.

3 Movies

1945.

2 Movies

1943.

2 Movies

1942.

6 Movies

1941.

6 Movies

1940.

6 Movies

1939.

5 Movies

1938.

10 Movies

1937.

10 Movies

1936.

6 Movies

1935.

11 Movies

1934.

10 Movies

1933.

13 Movies

1932.

6 Movies

1931.

1 Movie
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This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "Allen_Jenkins", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.