Discover Movies and TV shows that fit You with our Mobile Application
Download for iOS & Android
iOS ApplicationAndroid Application
Fay Wray

Fay Wray

Known For: Acting · Birthday: 1907-09-15 · Deathday: 2004-08-08 (96 years old) · Gender: Female · Place of Birth: Cardston, Alberta, Canada

88 Movies · 11 TV shows

Biography

Vina Fay Wray (September 15, 1907 – August 8, 2004) was a Canadian-born American actress best remembered for starring as Ann Darrow in the 1933 film King Kong. Through an acting career that spanned nearly six decades, Wray attained international recognition as an actress in horror films. She has been dubbed one of the early "scream queens". After appearing in minor film roles, Wray gained media attention after being selected as one of the "WAMPAS Baby Stars" in 1926. This led to her being contracted to Paramount Pictures as a teenager, where she made more than a dozen feature films. After leaving Paramount, she signed deals with various film companies, being cast in her first horror film roles, in addition to many other types of roles, including in The Bowery (1933) and Viva Villa (1934), both of which starred Wallace Beery. For RKO Radio Pictures, Inc., she starred in the film with which she is most identified, King Kong (1933). After the success of King Kong, Wray made numerous appearances in both film and television; she retired in 1980.

Career

In 1923, Wray appeared in her first film at the age of 16, when she landed a role in a short historical film sponsored by a local newspaper. In the 1920s, Wray landed a major role in the silent film The Coast Patrol (1925), as well as uncredited bit parts at the Hal Roach Studios. In 1926, the Western Association of Motion Picture Advertisers selected Wray as one of the "WAMPAS Baby Stars", a group of women whom they believed to be on the threshold of movie stardom. She was at the time under contract to Universal Studios, mostly co-starring in low-budget Westerns opposite Buck Jones. The following year, Wray was signed to a contract with Paramount Pictures. In 1926, director Erich von Stroheim cast her as the main female lead in his film The Wedding March, released by Paramount two years later. While the film was noted for its high budget and production values, it was a financial failure. It also gave Wray her first lead role. Wray stayed with Paramount to make more than a dozen films and made the transition from silent films to "talkies".

Personal Life

Wray married three times – to writers John Monk Saunders and Robert Riskin and the neurosurgeon Sanford Rothenberg (January 28, 1919 – January 4, 1991). She had three children: Susan Saunders, Victoria Riskin, and Robert Riskin Jr. She became a naturalized citizen of the United States in 1933.

Early Life

Wray was born on a ranch near Cardston in the province of Alberta, Canada to parents who were members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Elvina Marguerite Jones, who was from Salt Lake City, Utah, and Joseph Heber Wray, who was from Kingston upon Hull, England. She was one of six children and was a granddaughter of LDS pioneer Daniel Webster Jones. Her ancestors came from England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales. Wray was never baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Her family returned to the United States a few years after she was born; they moved to Salt Lake City in 1912 and moved to Lark, Utah, in 1914. In 1919, the Wray family returned to Salt Lake City, and then relocated to Hollywood, where Fay attended Hollywood High School.

Movies & TV shows

2011.

1 Movie

2005.

1 Movie

2003.

1 Movie

1998.

1 Movie

1997.

1 Movie

1987.

1 Movie · 1 TV show

1980.

1 Movie

1976.

1 Movie

1975.

1 Movie

1971.

1 Movie

1962.

1 TV show

1960.

1 TV show

1959.

1 TV show

1958.

2 Movies · 1 TV show

1957.

1 Movie · 1 TV show

1956.

2 Movies

1955.

3 Movies · 1 TV show

1953.

2 Movies · 1 TV show

1952.

2 TV shows

1951.

1 TV show

1949.

1 Movie

1944.

1 Movie

1941.

2 Movies

1940.

1 Movie

1939.

1 Movie

1938.

2 Movies

1937.

2 Movies

1936.

3 Movies

1935.

4 Movies

1934.

9 Movies

1933.

12 Movies

1932.

3 Movies

1931.

7 Movies

1930.

6 Movies

1929.

3 Movies

1928.

4 Movies

1926.

3 Movies

1925.

4 Movies
Last updated: 
This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "Fay_Wray", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.