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C. Aubrey Smith

C. Aubrey Smith

Known For: Acting · Birthday: 1863-07-21 · Deathday: 1948-12-20 (85 years old) · Gender: Male · Place of Birth: London, England, UK

97 Movies

Also Known As: Charles Aubrey Smith · Sir Charles Aubrey Smith · Sir C. Aubrey Smith · Sir Aubrey Smith · Aubrey Smith

Biography

Sir Charles Aubrey Smith, CBE (21 July 1863 – 20 December 1948) was an English Test cricketer who became a stage and film actor, acquiring a niche as the officer-and-gentleman type, as in the first sound version of The Prisoner of Zenda (1937). In Hollywood, he organised British actors into a cricket team, much intriguing local spectators.

Career

As a cricketer, Smith was primarily a right arm fast bowler, though he was also a useful right-hand lower-order batsman and a good slip fielder. His oddly curved bowling run-up, which started from deep mid-off, earned him the nickname "Round the Corner Smith". When he bowled round the wicket his approach was concealed from the batsman by the umpire until he emerged, leading W. G. Grace to comment "it is rather startling when he suddenly appears at the bowling crease." He played for Cambridge University (1882–85) and for Sussex at various times from 1882 to 1892. While in South Africa he captained the Johannesburg English XI. He captained England to victory in his only Test match, against South Africa at Port Elizabeth in 1888–89, taking five wickets for nineteen runs in the first innings. The English team who played were by no means representative of the best players of the time and nobody at the time realised that the match would enter the cricket records as an official Test match. In 1932, he founded the Hollywood Cricket Club and created a pitch with imported English grass. He attracted fellow expatriates such as David Niven, Laurence Olivier, Nigel Bruce (who served as captain), Leslie Howard and Boris Karloff to the club as well as local American players. Smith's stereotypical Englishness spawned several amusing anecdotes: while fielding at slip for the Hollywood Club, he dropped a difficult catch and ordered his English butler to fetch his spectacles; they were brought on to the field on a silver platter. The next ball looped gently to slip, to present the kind of catch that "a child would take at midnight with no moon." Smith dropped it and, snatching off his lenses, commented, "Damned fool brought my reading glasses." Decades after his cricket career had ended, when he had long been a famous face in films, Smith was spotted in the pavilion on a visit to Lord's. "That man over there seems familiar", remarked one member to another. "Yes", said the second, seemingly oblivious to his Hollywood fame, "Chap called Smith. Used to play for Sussex."

Early Life

Smith was born in London, England, to Charles John Smith (1838–1928), a medical doctor, and Sarah Ann (née Clode, 1836–1922). His sister, Beryl Faber (died 1912), was married to Cosmo Hamilton. Smith was educated at Charterhouse School and St John's College, Cambridge. He settled in South Africa to prospect for gold in 1888–89. While there he developed pneumonia and was wrongly pronounced dead by doctors. He married Isabella Wood in 1896.

Movies & TV shows

2003.

1 Movie

1949.

1 Movie

1948.

1 Movie

1947.

3 Movies

1946.

3 Movies

1945.

3 Movies

1944.

4 Movies

1943.

3 Movies

1941.

3 Movies

1940.

6 Movies

1939.

8 Movies

1938.

3 Movies

1937.

5 Movies

1936.

4 Movies

1935.

11 Movies

1934.

10 Movies

1933.

9 Movies

1932.

6 Movies

1931.

10 Movies

1930.

2 Movies

1922.

1 Movie
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This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "C._Aubrey_Smith", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.